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Save Posts Onto Your Computer
  • Create Downloads Folder
  • Copy Text into Clipboard
  • Paste into Blank Wordpad
  • Save as New File
  • Open a Saved File
  • Shortcut Keys
  • Copy from Other Sources
    Print Part of a Post
    Compose Posts Off-Line
    File Management: Naming and Finding Files
    Organize Favorites
    Backup Favorites
    Work in Two Windows
    Quick Tips for Slow Boards
    Those Annoying Pop-Up's
    Personal Start Page
    Save the author's e-mail

    Save Posts Onto Your Computer
    From: Paula

    It's not hard to save the wonderful information you find on the boards. This description is long, because it's harder to explain in writing; I had to make everything as clear as possible, because I'm not there to "look over your shoulder." I'll try to explain it, and you could even use this post as your first save (g). All mouse commands are left-button, unless otherwise noted.

    Essentially, you will create a folder for your downloads, create a blank document, copy text into your computer's virtual clipboard (part of its memory), "paste" what's now in the clipboard onto your blank document, save that no-longer-blank document under a new name, and leave the old blank document unaltered, ready for your next use. Once you've learned how, you can also copy from your files into e-mails, from e-mails into posts, virtually from anywhere into anywhere!



    Create Downloads Folder

    First you need to make a place for your posts to be saved. You'll only have to do this step once. Go to an unused area of your desktop. Right-click, and select New, then Folder. You should now have a folder labeled, "New Folder" on your desktop. Right click on it, select Rename, Backspace to get rid of the existing name, and type in the new name: Downloads. Press Enter to confirm it.



    Create Blank Wordpad Document

    Now you need a document to save things into. There are a few ways to do this, but here's what I like. You'll only have to do this step once, also. Press your Start button (down on the toolbar), select Programs, Accessories, Wordpad. Now, in the Wordpad you just created, select File, Save-As. Where it asks for a File name, delete out the existing name, and type in the new name: Blank Wordpad. Now, WHERE should you save it? The folder you created in the last paragraph, "Downloads," should be among your choices. (If it is not, see Note after these instructions.) Double-click on the Downloads folder, so that when you save this new blank wordpad file, it will be saved in your Downloads folder. The "Save-In" box should now say, "Downloads" and the File-name box should say, "Blank Wordpad". Click on Save to save it. This now provides a blank document, named "Blank Wordpad", in the folder "Downloads," which is on your desktop. You can use this blank file again and again. It is saved, so X out of that document.

    Rose sent me a great idea, that I'd never heard of. Unfortunately, my version doesn't have this option, so I can't test it (phooey!).

    When you create the blank wordpad document it might be helpful to save it as a read only document so that it isn't accidently changed to the new document type. On my windows version (ME) this is how I do that: When you get to the Save As window click on the tools menu then click on general options at the bottom of the dialog box click on read only recommended. It will give a prompt if you click on "save" rather than "save as."

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    Copy Text into Clipboard

    Now, here's the steps you'll use whenever you want to save a posting. We'll use my post (which you're reading) as an example. First, highlight the section you want to save. To do this, put you cursor at the beginning of the text. Press the left mouse button, and HOLD IT DOWN as you drag it down the text, highlighting as you go. When you come to the end of the desired text, let off the button, and the text remains highlighted. Now, with your mouse inside the highlighted portion, right-click, and select (LEFT-Click) Copy. When you selected Copy, you have put that text into your computer's "clipboard". You can't see it, but it's saved in temporary memory.



    Paste (Copy) into Blank Wordpad

    Now, double-click on that Downloads folder on your desktop (you may need to minimize your internet window, to find it). Double-click on your Blank Wordpad document, to open it. Now, with your cursor inside that document, right-click your mouse, and select Paste. Viola! There's the text. The Paste command spits out whatever was the last thing put into your clipboard.

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    Save as New File

    Now, in that document, select File, then Save-As. Delete out the existing file name, and type in your new name which describes the info. In this case, you could name it, "downloading posts". Click Save. Your document is saved in your Downloads file, and you can X to close the document.

    You can pull up that blank document every time you want to save something, as long as you assign your info a new name before you save it.

    I hope this makes sense, I hope you'll be able to use it, and I hope it works if your system is different from mine.

    Note: When you are saving your new "Blank Wordpad," if "Downloads" is not one of your choices, look around for it: try the Down-arrow next to the "Save in:" blank, or the Up-arrow to the right of the Down-arrow, to look around for a folder named Downloads.

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    Open a saved file

    Okay, now you've saved a file, how do you get to it to see it? Close any documents you're not using, to get them out of your way. From your desktop, double-click the Downloads folder. There you'll see any files you've saved here. To open one, double-click it.



    Shortcut Keys

    Once you have highlighted text, you can use Ctrl-C to copy it into your clipboard, instead of the menu steps. When you are ready to paste the clipboard text into your new document, you can use Ctrl-V instead of the Paste menu commands.

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    Copy from other sources

    Now, let's say you have this great Blueberry Buckle recipe you found on the net, and you used the above steps to copy it into your own Download folder. Well, what if Cousin Sadie wants you to e-mail it to her? Do you have to retype it into your letter to her? Of course not! Just follow the steps above in Copy Text into Clipboard, then go to your e-mail to Cousin Sadie, and paste it there: with your cursor inside that e-mail document, right-click your mouse, and select Paste. Remember: the Paste command spits out whatever was the last thing put into your clipboard.

    You can do the same thing if you want to post that Blueberry Buckle to a bulletin board/forum: Copy the recipe into your clipboard, then paste it on the bulletin board, where you'd normally type your post.

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    Print Part of a Post

    Let's say you want to print the body of a post, without all the other "stuff" on the page.

    Left click and drag your cursor over all the text you want to print in order to highlight it. Then, click on "file" on your browser and choose "print." When your print box comes up, you'll see a section that says "Print Range" and in that place there will be an option that says "Selection" (this option is only activated if you've already highlighted some text). Click there to select that option and then click on "print" or "OK" and you'll be all set! Only the text you've highlighted will print.

    Thank you, Brenda of Sonlight, for such clear instructions.

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    Compose Posts Off-Line

    Suppose you read a post which really starts you thinking. You want to respond, but you want some time to think about it and carefully compose your response, without worrying about tying up the phone line. How can you compose off-line?

    1. View the original: If I'm responding to a post, I find it helpful to keep the original post handy to refer to. Have the desired post on your screen, in a window (Restore), not full-screen (Maximize) mode. Disconnect from the Internet.

    2. Open a WordPad: If you already created a downloads folder and a blank WordPad document, you can use that blank. If not, press your Start button (down on the toolbar), select Programs, Accessories, WordPad. Do your writing and editing in that document.

    3. Save the File? If you already have a Downloads folder, I'd suggest you Save this new document there, with an appropriate File Name, for future reference. It's not really necessary to save the file, but it does tend to rescue you from those "Ooops!" moments. You may even wish to create a new sub-folder in your Downloads folder, named "My Posts."

    4. Post to a Bulletin Board: In the document you created, Highlight the text and copy it into your clipboard. Then get on-line, and go to the place you want to post it. With your cursor in the area where you'd normally type your post, Paste from your clipboard into the post, and proceed as usual.

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    File Management

    Naming Files

    When you save a post into your files, make sure to save it with a good, descriptive file name, so you can find it with a "Find" command (from your Start menu) later. Let's say you named a file, "Math graph paper columns." That way, 6 months later, when you're scratching your head to find it in the 60 files you've saved, you could find it with a search by "math," "graph," or "columns." It's likely you'd remember at least one of them. But if you had named it, "Sadie's good idea," good luck finding it!


    Finding Files

    To find one of your files, you only need to remember one word from the file name. Click on the START button (at the bottom left corner of your screen on most computers). Select FIND then FILES. Where it says "Named" enter a word from the file name. Click on "Find Now" and it will list all files it finds, which contain that word. Double-click on the file you want, to open it.

    You can speed up this search, by having it search only your Downloads folder, instead of your entire system. Here's how: after you've entered a word from the file name, click BROWSE. Find the folder named "Downloads" and click on it once. Now, when you select "Find Now," it will search only your Downloads folder.


    Sorting Files

    You can even make sub-folders under your Download folder. You could name them Math, Books, Art, Science, Parenting, etc. Here's how: close any documents you're not using, to get them out of your way. From your desktop, double-click the Downloads folder. From the menu at the top, select File, then New, then Folder. It will create a new folder, with the name "New Folder" (catchy, huh?). Right-click on this new folder, select Rename, delete out the old name, type in your new name (e.g. Books), and press Enter.

    Now, you'll want to move existing files from your Downloads folder into the new Books folder. We'll refer to an imaginary file named Twain. With your mouse on the Twain file, hold down the left mouse button, and drag Twain into the Books folder (so Twain "covers" the Books folder). When you release the mouse button, Twain is "dropped" into the Books folder. To check it, double-click the Books folder, and there you see Twain.

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    Organize Favorites

    The following instructions is for those who want to organize an existing Favorites list. To organize your favorites as you add new ones, see this About.Com article.

    First, find the folder named Favorites: on your Start menu (the Start button on the bottom left corner of your screen), select Find, then Files. In the box labeled "Named," type Favorites then Press "Find Now."  Look in your results for a FOLDER (yellow on my machine, looks like a file folder) named Favorites. Double-click to open it. From the menu at the top, select File, then New, then Folder. It will create a new folder, with the name "New Folder." Right-click on this new folder, select Rename, delete out the old name, type in your new name (e.g. History), and press Enter. Now, you'll want to move existing files from your Favorites folder into the new History folder. We'll refer to an imaginary file named Timelines. With your mouse on the Timelines file, hold down the left mouse button, and drag Timelines into the History folder (so Timelines "covers" the History folder). When you release the mouse button, Timelines is "dropped" into the History folder. To check it, double-click the History folder, and there you see Timelines.

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    Backup Favorites

    See below for instructions for AOL users.

    I just heard about a site which might make the following backup instructions obsolete: Clickmarks.Com, web-based bookmarks! You can export your own bookmarks directly onto your personal free account there, and then access them from any computer, such as when you're at the library. The site says you can also send the collection of bookmarks, or parts of it, to someone else. Might be handy, when someone else loses their bookmarks!

    I haven't used it, but this system sounds easier than the backup procedure I've outlined below, and also more reliable. One negative: it appears they're not configured for AOL bookmarks.

    If anyone tries their system, please e-mail me to let me know how you like it.

    Your favorites are actually in a folder named Favorites, in your Windows directory. On your Start menu (the Start button on the bottom left corner of your screen), select Find, then Files. In the box labeled "Named," type Favorites then Press "Find Now."  Look in your results for a FOLDER (yellow on my machine, looks like a file folder) named Favorites. Right-click on it, and select (LEFT-Click) Copy. When you've selected Copy, you have put that folder into your computer's "clipboard."  You can't see it, but it's saved in temporary memory.

    Now, put a disk in your floppy drive. Double-Click the "My Computer" icon on your desktop. Right-click on the floppy-drive icon, then select (Left-click) Paste. This pastes whatever was in your clipboard (the favorites folder) into the target of your Paste, in this case the floppy disk. Label this disk so you can find it later. Backup your favorites periodically.

    You can copy other folders this way, as well. For example, I periodically save my Downloads folder to a floppy, too.

    To recover Favorites from your Backup disk: You want to copy from your backup disk into the appropriate Favorites folder of your computer. Put the backup disk into the computer's floppy drive. In "My Computer," double-click on the floppy-drive icon. Find the icon for your Favorites folder on your back-up floppy (they're in a folder, not loose, right?). Open it. Select Edit, then "Select All." This should highlight all the files. Then select Edit, then Copy. This copies all those files into your clipboard.

    Now, from the Start button, select Find, and find the computer's Favorites folder, just like you did before. Open that folder, put your cursor in a vacant area, right-click, and select Paste. This pastes all the files from your clipboard into the new Favorites folder.

    AOL Backups

    I don't have AOL, but Jen in FL says that this is the procedure for AOL users: Click on your "Favorites" folder. At the bottom of the list, there are icons (New, Edit, etc). Choose the Save/Replace icon and follow the instructions from there. Make sure you save them to an EXTERNAL drive (A:\ or whatever your floppy/zip drive letter is). The procedure for saving your address book in AOL is similar.

    Tracy in Texas adds, "I don't back up each part of my AOL program that needs it. I go into my AOL program and copy the 'organize' folder. This copies the filing cabinet and address book for each screen name."

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    Work in Two Windows

    Definitions: Did you know that you can have two different documents going at the same time? or five or ten? When I refer to a document in these instructions, it can be an e-mail, a web page, a Wordpad document, or most any other task you'll have up on your screen. The Task Bar is normally at the bottom of your screen, and begins with your Start button. Any open documents will be represented by a button on the Task Bar.

    Window Size: If the document you're working on is taking up the full screen, reduce its size. (If you're not sure how to switch from full screen to a window, or how to adjust the size of an existing window, see Change Window Size.) This is not absolutely necessary for working in two windows, but it sure helps.

    Two Windows, Off-line: Working in two windows is easy. Open one of the Wordpad documents in your Downloads folder. If it's in full-screen mode, change it to a window (see Change Window Size). Now open another Wordpad document. There! You are now working in two windows.

    Navigating Your Windows: To change which window you're in, left-click in the desired window. You can also select it by clicking its button on the task bar on the bottom of the screen. To move the windows around your desktop, place the cursor inside the bar at the top of the document's window (the bar that contains the document name and the Minimize, Maximize, and X buttons). Hold the left mouse button down, and drag the whole window to its new location.

    Two Web Page Windows: Imagine someone on a board wants a shoo-fly pie recipe, and you know where there's a good one. But if you go to that site to get the right address, you'll lose your place on the current board. No problem. In the menu at the top of your window, select File, New Window. Now, in your second window, you can go looking for that web address you wanted. When you find it and have copied it, you can either Close your new window, or leave it open in case you need to go looking for something else. Use the same navigating methods as you did in the last section.

    If the file you want to peek at has a link on your current page, it's even easier. Right-click on its link, and select "Open in New Window."

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    Quick Tips for Slow Boards

    Okay, what if your favorite board is slower than a three-toed sloth? You finally get it loaded, but as soon as you open a post, you've lost it, and you need to wait again for it to load. Right? Wrong! When you see a post you want to read, DON'T click on it! Instead, right-click on it, and select "Open in New Window." When you finish reading it, you can X out of it, and you still have the main board up in your original window.

    I often "leapfrog" posts. I'll have the main board open, and open Abigail's post in a new window. While I'm waiting for it to open, I'll go back to the main board, and open Belinda's post in a third window. While Belinda's in opening, I'll go back to Abigail's, which is loaded by now. After reading it, I will X it, and continue leapfrogging like that.

    One more thing: while you're waiting for that slow page to open initially, there's no reason you can't select File, New Window, and use that new window to do something else while you wait for the slow one to load. It may slow the loading even more, but at least you can be using the time.

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    Those Annoying Pop-Up's

    Know what I hate about pop-up ads? You X out of one, and before you know it, along comes another one! The solution is, don't X them. What?? No, instead of X'ing the pop-up, Minimize it (see Change Window Size). That way it's still running, but it's down on your task bar, out of your way. And when the web site sends you a new pop-up, guess where it goes? Down on that task bar, out of your way!

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    Your Own Personal Start Page

    Friends, I think this is really slick. It's still Under Construction, but if you're feeling adventurous, I'll give you a quick peek. I've created a template, which you can use to make your very own start page. It will act like a web page, but it will be stored on your own machine, not on the internet. You can create a menu of your favorite sites, and pull them up from there instead of an overcrowded Favorites list. You'll need to have your own Downloads folder, be familiar with Copy and Paste, and be able to Downloads folder and work in two windows.

    Open My Page in a new window. In the menu at the top, select File, Save As File. Put it in your Downloads file, with a file name mypage.htm , Save as type: HTML. Now, X out of Paula's My Page file, and open your own in your Downloads file. With your cursor at a blank place in My Page, right-click and select View Source. This is the HTML code for My Page. Play around with it, I'll bet you can figure out how it works. Try putting in your own favorite files in the File Name lines I left you; just follow the same format as the samples. Be brave! Try changing your background color! To view your changes, save your HTML code file. Back on your own My Page, press Refresh. How's it look? Fiddle with it some more. Now, here's the fun part: select Favorites, Add to Favorites, give it the name AA Start (so it shows up at the top of your favorites list). Now, every time you get on the internet, you can pull up your own start page, and open your favorite pages in new windows, leaving your start page waiting on your desktop. At least on my machine, I have to open it AFTER I'm already on-line, otherwise the links don't work.

    Be brave, fool around with it, and let me know how it turns out. Soon people will be coming to YOU for computer advice!

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    Save the author's e-mail

    If you're saving someone's post for your files, it's a good idea to save their e-mail address with it. That way, if you want to use it later, you can e-mail them for more information, or to ask their permission to quote them. If they entered their e-mail when they posted the message, their name will be marked in a different color at the beginning of the post. (If the name is not in a different color, they didn't leave their e-mail, so you won't be able to save it.) Click on the different-colored name. Up pops a mail format with their e-mail address. As described above, highlight their e-mail address, copy it into your clipboard, and paste it into the beginning of the download file where you saved their post. Don't forget to save your revised download file. You can x out of the e-mail format. Thank you to Kathy R. for that reminder.


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